Do Women Really Need a Female-Targeted Viagra?

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Viagra is one of the most successful and life-changing drugs to ever have been invented, and has caused a stir in the sex industry ever since it was created – it is now used by over 20 million men worldwide for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. However, a version for women has never been found, despite numerous researchers in a number of companies searching for an answer to this problem. Despite the search being on-going for more than a decade, no-one has ever found a problem to the female sex drive issue. The latest disappointment to add to the list is a drug known as flibanserin, which is a contender for the first approved drug to combat low sexual desire in women.

 

The Food and Drug Administration advisory panel advised against it’s approval, stating that the slight increase in female sexual satisfaction wasn’t enough to outweigh the potential side effects, such as fatigue and depression. Though it is more commonly publicised as a male problem, women do experience sexual dysfunction as well. However, experts claim that the problems is all too often a lack of desire rather than a physical problem with performing. There is a risk of GPs and medical professionals over-diagnosing women with a hypoactive sexual dysfunction, which is characterised by a low sexual desire, which can cause distress. However, for many women, this issue doesn’t need to be treated with a pill – it can be easily treated with therapy or other approaches. Taking a pill, they say, would be an easy way out. It’s true that some women could benefit from a drug to increase their sexual appetite, but they are unsure how many women this would include. Viagra is something of a one-size-fits-all treatment, whereas the same for women wouldn’t necessarily be the case.

 

Studies show that around one in ten women in the U.S experience some form of HSDD, but there is no such thing as a normal sex drive in order to determine how often a woman should be craving sex in order to be considered healthy. This is where the problem lies – a low sex drive can often be relative to the person suffering from it. There are also two other common sexual complaints in female patients, which are arousal and orgasmic disorder. Around five percent of women suffer with this problem and this can often affect other problems such as your sex drive. With this in mind, how can you tell what is affecting your sex drive?

 

The first step if you’re struggling with a low sex drive is to talk to your GP. Many women don’t discuss such problems with their doctor due to embarrassment or because they feel as though their GP isn’t interested in what they have to say. But other medical conditions may be involved, so discussing it is vital in order to get to the root of the issue. It is advised that you book a separate appointment to discuss the problem, rather than trying to fit it into an appointment about another health concern, as it requires a lot of questions and possibly a physical exam. If you’re more interested in sex when you’re not tired, such as when you’re on holiday, then it may be easy to decipher that the problem is fatigue. Your GP may suggest making some lifestyle changes to see if this solves the issue. However, hormonal changes as you age may also be a cause, so it’s vital that you explain everything to your GP so that they can help you.


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