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The Relationship between Blood Sugar Levels & Weight Loss
The Relationship between Blood Sugar Levels & Weight Loss
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Article Author : Editor (July 23, 2013)

One of the simplest ways to lose weight on a long term basis is by managing hunger levels according to a meal plan that can be sustained permanently. Fibre’s role in restraining the appetite is well known, but the management of glucose levels in the blood is equally important. Glycemic index first emerged as a way to manage insulin stability in diabetes patients. Since then, its usefulness to those without sugar level problems became a tool for weight loss. The term, `glycemic index` refers to how suddenly carbohydrates bring spikes and dips in blood sugar levels. Scientists had previously believed that simple carbohydrates had a more pronounced effect on insulin while complex carbohydrates added stability. After extensive studies, surprising results emerged, revealing that many simple carbohydrates had a stabilizing effect and that some grains had varying GI levels dependent on how well they had been cooked. This changed the way people approached their meals. While GI is an efficient tool to add to a weight loss program, it cannot work in isolation. Overeating on a low GI diet will produce as much weight gain as overeating on high GI foods. The system, therefore, needs to accompany a controlled eating plan.

 

Low GI diets bring the benefits of sustained sugar levels, preventing light-headedness and sudden appetite changes only hours after eating a full meal. As such, their role is similar to that of high fibre diets in that they prevent hypoglycemia, which in turn prevents cravings for unhealthy carbohydrates. The body needs carbohydrates in order to provide the cells with the energy they need to function healthily. The pancreas is responsible for keeping blood sugar levels balanced, but eating high GI foods can cause problems for this organ. Blood sugar levels rise suddenly and fall equally quickly, which can cause insulin resistance.

 

By maintaining a diet that consists mostly of foods with GIs of below 55, with some medium GI foods between 56 and 59, blood sugar spikes can be minimized, which keeps appetites balanced. Hunger is delayed, which is said to cause gradual weight loss. Those on GI diets typically do not count calories and are given enough room to occasionally indulge in high GI foods. For this reason, GI plans are a popular option that offers the luxury to choose the foods one prefers to eat. Trials suggest that low GI diets do not cause weight loss single-handedly, but instead, make low calorie diets easier to sustain. Their role in reducing blood sugar, lowering LDL cholesterol levels and reducing blood pressure has been endorsed by the American Diabetes Association, but calorie control remains a factor. In this regard, GI diets make it simple to cut out a limited number of calories while making exercise routines easier to maintain.

 

Changes in diet should be done under a doctor`s supervision and GI diets require a special level of expertise since GI levels cannot be judged intuitively. Potatoes are simple carbohydrates, yet they have a surprisingly low glycemic index. Durum wheat pasta is another simple carb with an unexpectedly low GI level. The foods that are added to grains affect GI levels overall, with lean white meats, certain seafood and grilled vegetables decreasing a meal`s GI significantly. GI diets make foods that are omitted from most diets a viable, if occasional, option. A serving of sponge cake has a medium GI of 66 and can be used as a treat that replaces the comparatively high GI of pizza, which has a level of 86. Similarly, reducing the GI level of a meal is made more effective with the simple replacement of soy milk (43 GI) instead of full cream milk.

 

The GI diets are made more complex by the inclusion of glycemic load, which takes the serving size into account when calculating the GI. It can be calculated by multiplying the GI with the serving size and dividing that figure by 100. This way, dieters can take all weight loss factors into account without complex calorie counting.

 

Whether training routines include http://www.sportsballshop.co.uk/acatalog/Rugby-Balls.html miles of tarmac or the serene asanas of a yoga class, exercise reduces blood sugar quickly. By pairing a fitness regimen with a diet of low GI foods, these activity-related sugar dips can be reduced, keeping energy at optimum levels to improve the quality of workouts. Athletes using a low GI diet need to take in meals that support their activity levels and with the aid of meal plans and nutrients that take control of blood sugar levels, results can be improved drastically.

Allergies And Asthma

Could Colds During Pregnancy Lead To Child As...
Studies suggest that mothers who catch a cold during pregnancy could be more likely to have children who develop asthma, as the bacteria and viruses affect the in-utero environment. Babies who are exposed to the allergens are more likely to become sensitive to them and this could affect them later in life, according to researchers. The new study, which examined the risk of the common cold to unborn children, shows that women who are pregnant should take extra precautions around people who have colds and are sneezing, as it could lead to problems for their children later in life. The mothers infections and bacterial exposure during the pregnancy leads to the environment in the womb being altered. Allergist Dr Mitch Grayson stated that in addition to this, the same children in the study who had early exposure to allergens, including house dust and pet hair, also had increased odds of becoming sensitive by the age of five. When dust mites from the mother and the child’s mattresses were analysed, children with high dust mite exposure yet low bacteria exposure were more likely to develop allergies to dust mites than those with low dust mite exposure and high bacteria exposure.   Researchers looked at 513 pregnant women in Germany, and their 526 children. The women completed questionnaires during the pregnancy, when the children were 3 and 12 months old, and then every year up until the children reached five years old. Of the families, 61 per cent of them had a parent with asthma, hay fever or atopic dermatitis. According to the ACAAI, asthma and allergies can be hereditary; if both parents have allergies, the child is as much as 75 per cent more likely to be allergic. If just one parent is allergic, or if a close relative has allergies, then the child has a 30 to 40 per cent chance of developing some form of allergy. This drops to just 10 to 15 per cent if neither parent has an allergy. Researchers claim that they now know for certain that allergies and asthma can develop in the womb, as genetics play an important factor in both diseases. However, this study sheds light on how the environment a mother creates during pregnancy can begin to affect the child before it’s even been born. Asthma is the most common potentially serious medical condition to complicate pregnancy, according to the ACAAI.   Asthma affects around 1 in 12 women during their childbearing years, and when women with asthma become pregnant, one third of the patients improve, one third get worse, and one third remain unchanged. Asthma is a serious condition which affects a number of people and has numerous triggers, including house mites, dust, pollen and pollution. As pollution and toxins in the air have increased over the years, the risk of developing respiratory diseases has also increased. There are ways to treat asthma and, depending on the severity of the condition, your child may require medication to maintain it. If you're concerned about the risk colds and asthma have to your baby, or think your child is developing symptoms of asthma, you should seek advice from your GP as soon as possible. As with any pregnancy, it's important to stay as healthy as possible, maintain a balanced diet which includes all the nutrients both you and your baby need, and get enough exercise; you should also avoid alcohol and smoking, to maintain good health for both you and your baby.
Could Second-Hand Smoke Be Damaging Your Chil...
A new study has found that the health concerns associated with the wellness and wellbeing of children who live with smokers could be more serious than previously thought. A shocking report shows that children who are exposed to cigarette smoke at home do not respond as well to asthma treatment as those who live with non-smoking parents in a non-smoking household.   Children who are regularly exposed to cigarette smoke had lower levels of an enzyme that helps them to respond to the main asthma treatments. This report was published in a journal called Chest recently.   This is bad news, as the number of children in the UK who have asthma is on the increase. Over a million children in this country are believed to be suffering from asthma, and they are most commonly treated by steroids and inhalers. For some patients, however, these treatments are not totally effective, leaving them unprotected from harm in the event of an attack.   It is now known that passive smoke can not only worsen the symptoms of asthma in children, but can actually impair their response to treatments in the form of inhaled steroids. It is not yet known how or why this effect occurs.   Researchers into the subject have found that children who have severe asthma, and parents who smoke at home, have a lower level of an enzyme called HDAC2, especially when compared like for like with children who do not have smoking parents.   This enzyme – HDAC2 – is required in the human body to help it benefit from steroids, and to allow them to exert their anti-inflammatory type effects over the symptoms of asthma.   To come to this conclusion, researchers looked at a group of 19 children who were suffering from severe asthma. Nine of the children in the group had a parent who smoked whilst ten of the children had parents who were non smokers.

Cancer

Lynne Cohen Foundation Crowdfunds to Beat Can...
Go to Source   Anti-cancer group the Lynne Cohen Foundation serves women facing breast and ovarian cancers on a national scale, and has done so for 16 years. Now, their new website delivers information, hope, and a sense of community to families across the nation to broaden awareness and extend impact for families facing increased risk of women’s cancers. The launch of the new website coincides with the foundation’s #sockittocancer crowdfunding campaign which features dollar-for-dollar matching up to $75,000 and a partnership with Pointe Studio Socks.  The initial goal of raising $60,000 is 86% of the way funded. The campaign will fund multidisciplinary preventive care clinics at University of Southern California, University of Alabama, Birmingham, and New York University.   Ovarian and breast cancers are correlated and genetically linked, and women facing risk and/or diagnosis too often find themselves without the necessary tools to prevent future disease. Ali Oshinsky faced breast cancer in her early thirties, and credits the Lynne Cohen Preventive Clinic in Los Angeles with saving her life. Her multidisciplinary team at the clinic successfully treated her breast cancer, but also designed and implemented a prevention strategy to address her risk for ovarian cancer. She now breathes easy with her husband and three children at their home in California, knowing that her risk is almost completely reduced, and that she has a lifelong, multidisciplinary, and compassionate medical team on her side. Bringing physicians with diverse specialties together within their preventive care clinics, the Lynne Cohen Foundation emphasizes the importance of risk assessment, prevention, and personalized medical care, guidance, and attention.   Lynne Cohen Foundation is a leading non-profit fighting women’s cancers through prevention and education.
 
Pancreatic Cancer Advocacy Day sheds light on...
Go to Source WASHINGTON -- Pancreatic cancer is a ruthless killer -- the fourth -leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. And it's predicted to become the nation's second-deadliest form of cancer by 2020.   "There are no early warning signs and there are no tests for pancreatic cancer," says Ralph Cheney, from Monticello, New York. That's what makes it so deadly -- once it's diagnosed, it's too far along. Cheney is a 10-year pancreatic cancer survivor, which, he says, is nearly unheard of.   This year more 46,000 Americans will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and 75 percent of them will die in the first year. Only six percent of patients survive it -- the lowest survival rate of any major form of cancer.   But one group is pressuring Congress to help change these statistics. Tuesday is Pancreatic Cancer Advocacy Day, and Ralph Cheney; his wife, Mariann Cheney; and nearly 500 advocates are heading to Capitol Hill on Tuesday to try to save lives.   They are fighting for research funding, which is part of a bill -- the Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act -- that became law last year. The research money would help develop early-detection tests and new treatments.   The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has been pushing for more federal funding to improve the survival rates for patients with this form of cancer.  

Diabetes

Can Yoghurt Be Connected To Lower Diabetes Ri...
The media is always claiming that certain ingredients can help us to maintain a healthy lifestyle and improve our wellbeing. The latest headlines state that yoghurt is key to beating diabetes; a claim based on a study which associates dairy with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The study found that the risk of diabetes was significantly lowered by as much as 28 per cent in people who ate large amounts of low-fat yoghurt, compared to people who ate none at all. The results were similar in people who ate more of all low-fat fermented products, including cottage cheese and fromage frais. The study was based on people using food diaries to report their dairy intake around the time of eating, which is one of the best ways to gauge the success of a trial rather than asking people to recall what they’ve eaten throughout the day - it tends to be more accurate. The diaries were only used over a seven-day period (which isn’t a long enough to provide an accurate assessment of whether yoghurt can help with diabetes risks). It’s not currently clear whether fermented low-fat dairy products can help to prevent diabetes, but it is a theory researchers are keen to investigate. There are a number of steps you can take to lower your risk of developing diabetes though, such as regular exercise, eating a balanced healthy diet, quitting smoking and lowering your alcohol intake. It’s also important to note the sugar levels in the foods you eat, as these can contribute towards developing not just diabetes but also obesity. If you're concerned about your diet or weight, it's important to seek advice as this can contribute to a number of health concerns, in addition to diabetes, such as heart problems and certain cancers.   The study was carried out by the University of Cambridge, as part of a larger study funded by the Medical Research Council and Cancer Research UK. Researchers discovered that people who ate the most low-fat fermented products were 24 per cent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who ate the least. The total dairy, high fat dairy, milk and cheese were not associated to the development of diabetes, nor was low-fat dairy. There are several limitations to this study which have led researchers to question whether or not yoghurt can actually help lower the risk of diabetes. Firstly, people’s reported dairy intake was only collected once, at baseline, over a seven-day period, so it’s possible that people’s diets didn’t stay the same during the 11 year follow-up period. Furthermore, the information was self-reported which could affect the reliability. Lastly, researchers didn’t take into account the dairy products included in cooking composite dishes. While there were attempts to take account of other factors, it is always possible that measured and unmeasured factors had an influence on the results. Further studies need to take place in order to know for certain whether fermented products can help to lower the risk of diabetes. The results do suggest that switching sugary snacks and meals for low-fat dairy products could help your overall health, as well as improving your diabetes prospects. Just be sure to choose low sugar varieties and to balance your diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables, grains and lean protein to ensure your body is getting all the nutrients it needs to stay healthy.
The Foot Problems Associated With Diabetes...
Diabetes is a well-known health concern. It’s growing too – type 2 diabetes is one of the fastest growing conditions in the western world, and that’s thought to be due to increasingly bad diets that people have. The increased levels of fat and sugar are very bad for our blood and diabetes is the end result of this. Diabetes famously causes a number of serious health problems and many people worry a lot about it. It is common knowledge that diabetes puts you at risk of having other serious problems, but you may not know that it can be a real burden for your feet. Here is a breakdown of why diabetes can be bad for your feet.   One of the major problems with your feet when you have diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. What happens when you have this is that you’ll begin to feel a lack of sensation in your feet and your legs. This is often accompanied by a tingling or burning sensation as well as pain and completely numbness in the affected area. The cause of this problem is actually nerve damage that has come about due to the effects of uncontrolled diabetes. The problem is that it leads to a whole range of other issues with your feet such as the inability to move it properly and this can clearly lead to problems walking or doing anything that involves your feet.   There is also another serious condition of the feet that manifests itself due to diabetes. It is called peripheral vascular disease, and it causes poor blood flow that affects the ability of sores or cuts on your feet to heal themselves. Your feet are actually very prone to this kind of problem due to the general wear and tear that daily life places upon them – and unfortunately the lack of ability to heal puts you at very serious risk of gangrene and ulcers.   Apart from these very serious issues with your feet, it’s true that diabetes can be a tertiary cause of other problems with your feet. While these will not be a very dangerous problem on their own, with the threats of diabetes that can develop, these less serious issues become something that could potentially cause you to require surgery or even amputation.   One major issue that you may not think to worry about is athlete’s foot. Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that can cause itchiness and the break of skin, as we have already seen that diabetic neuropathy is a huge problem with regards to broken skin, it’s easy to see how athlete’s foot can become a very problematic condition.   Aside from conditions like athlete’s foot there are many other smaller problems that we usually wouldn’t worry about that can be a serious issue if you have diabetes and the foot conditions associated with it. Even things as seemingly meaningless as corns, hard skin, dry skin, bunions and blisters can develop into quite horrible concerns for your health.   So how can you avoid these problems and retain a healthy and happy lifestyle despite your diabetes? The first point is that you should always remember to take care of your healthy generally and stay in control of your diabetes. Problems associated with diabetes can only become a concern when you neglect your health. It’s also important that you take care of your feet and check them every day for any potential problems. If you find any then it is essential that you visit your doctor as soon as possible so that you can be prescribed a treatment that will be effective.